Wednesday, September 23, 2009

August sales by city

Here's the august numbers by city. Most of the year over year declines are still huge. Riverside had a rather shocking increase from July to August. I guess the city sold all the low end homes. Corona's median dropped a few thousand. Most of the other cities were about the same. It looks like most of the counties increase in median price can be attributed to the city of Riverside. It had 13% of the sales and it's median price went up 30% in one month! I think we can write that one off to statistical fluke (or error in the data, which seems likely given the huge increase). I looked up some numbers on a Realtors site and they are way less than DQ's numbers for Riverside. So something is up there.

Riverside County 4,074 $190,000 $247,000 -23.08%
AGUANGA 4 $147,500 $237,000 -37.76%
ANZA 3 $107,500 $91,000 18.13%
BANNING 49 $115,000 $157,500 -26.98%
BEAUMONT 155 $207,000 $261,000 -20.69%
BLYTHE 9 $180,000 $185,000 -2.70%
CABAZON 3 $92,500 $157,000 -41.08%
CALIMESA 7 $130,000 $235,000 -44.68%
CATHEDRAL CITY 74 $150,000 $217,500 -31.03%
COACHELLA 47 $147,000 $220,000 -33.18%
CORONA 401 $307,545 $350,000 -12.13%
DESERT HOT SPRINGS 89 $91,500 $135,000 -32.22%
HEMET 209 $118,000 $174,000 -32.18%
HOMELAND 4 $140,000 $195,000 -28.21%
IDYLLWILD 7 $140,000 $307,500 -54.47%
INDIAN WELLS 8 $421,000 $675,000 -37.63%
INDIO 159 $180,000 $240,000 -25.00%
LA QUINTA 113 $275,000 $377,000 -27.06%
LAKE ELSINORE 183 $175,000 $220,000 -20.45%
MECCA 4 $82,500 $85,000 -2.94%
MENIFEE 108 $195,000 $255,000 -23.53%
MIRA LOMA 46 $315,000 $359,000 -12.26%
MORENO VALLEY 409 $140,000 $183,000 -23.50%
MOUNTAIN CENTER 3 $110,000 $199,000 -44.72%
MURRIETA 251 $236,000 $280,000 -15.71%
NORCO 34 $307,000 $445,000 -31.01%
NUEVO 14 $155,250 $215,000 -27.79%
PALM DESERT 111 $255,000 $335,000 -23.88%
PALM SPRINGS 199 $133,000 $277,000 -51.99%
PERRIS 179 $140,000 $185,000 -24.32%
RANCHO MIRAGE 47 $460,000 $465,000 -1.08%
RIVERSIDE 527 $230,000 $242,000 -4.96%
SAN JACINTO 119 $138,000 $185,000 -25.41%
SUN CITY 126 $155,000 $215,000 -27.91%
TEMECULA 234 $261,000 $325,000 -19.69%
THERMAL 3 $147,500 n/a n/a
THOUSAND PALMS 10 $109,500 $171,750 -36.24%
WHITE WATER 3 $100,000 $137,000 -27.01%
WILDOMAR 60 $236,477 $300,000 -21.17%
WINCHESTER 60 $232,000 $280,000 -17.14%


San Bernardino County 3,206 $145,000 $215,000 -32.56%
ADELANTO 123 $82,500 $126,000 -34.52%
APPLE VALLEY 155 $106,000 $157,000 -32.48%
BARSTOW 31 $70,000 $135,000 -48.15%
BIG BEAR CITY 36 $138,000 $207,500 -33.49%
BIG BEAR LAKE 32 $325,000 $324,000 0.31%
BLOOMINGTON 44 $146,000 $195,000 -25.13%
BLUE JAY 2 $157,500 $312,500 -49.60%
CEDAR GLEN 2 $74,500 $125,000 -40.40%
CEDARPINES PARK 3 $68,000 $111,545 -39.04%
CHINO 84 $311,750 $348,000 -10.42%
CHINO HILLS 69 $386,000 $475,000 -18.74%
COLTON 67 $115,000 $151,250 -23.97%
CREST PARK 2 $180,000 $775,000 -76.77%
CRESTLINE 23 $135,000 $171,250 -21.17%
FAWNSKIN 3 $212,000 $232,500 -8.82%
FONTANA 413 $195,000 $260,000 -25.00%
FOREST FALLS 3 $75,000 $185,000 -59.46%
GRAND TERRACE 6 $200,000 $240,000 -16.67%
GREEN VALLEY LAKE 2 $216,250 $225,000 -3.89%
HELENDALE 27 $130,000 $202,250 -35.72%
HESPERIA 243 $112,000 $187,500 -40.27%
HIGHLAND 69 $159,500 $200,000 -20.25%
JOSHUA TREE 17 $90,000 $118,000 -23.73%
LAKE ARROWHEAD 33 $265,000 $353,500 -25.04%
LANDERS 4 $48,500 $172,000 -71.80%
LOMA LINDA 21 $250,000 $350,000 -28.57%
LUCERNE VALLEY 6 $50,000 $145,000 -65.52%
LYTLE CREEK 2 $51,750 $110,000 -52.95%
MENTONE 14 $259,000 $225,000 15.11%
MONTCLAIR 33 $210,000 $264,000 -20.45%
MORONGO VALLEY 9 $66,500 $166,500 -60.06%
ONTARIO 142 $183,500 $260,000 -29.42%
PHELAN 30 $161,000 $208,000 -22.60%
PINON HILLS 8 $158,250 $199,000 -20.48%
RANCHO CUCAMONGA 212 $279,500 $380,000 -26.45%
REDLANDS 73 $215,000 $295,000 -27.12%
RIALTO 168 $140,000 $200,000 -30.00%
RIMFOREST 2 $123,500 $185,000 -33.24%
RUNNING SPRINGS 12 $99,000 $155,000 -36.13%
SAN BERNARDINO 371 $80,000 $133,000 -39.85%
SUGARLOAF 16 $105,750 $183,500 -42.37%
TWENTYNINE PALMS 19 $95,000 $110,500 -14.03%
TWIN PEAKS 6 $109,000 $79,000 37.97%
UPLAND 66 $387,500 $417,500 -7.19%
VICTORVILLE 394 $114,750 $170,000 -32.50%
WRIGHTWOOD 6 $180,000 $225,000 -20.00%
YUCAIPA 50 $220,750 $285,000 -22.54%
YUCCA VALLEY 48 $125,000 $124,500 0.40%
San Diego County 3,176 $322,000 $348,000 -7.47%
ALPINE 17 $384,000 $390,000 -1.54%
BONITA 12 $390,000 $487,500 -20.00%
BONSALL 4 $260,000 $222,500 16.85%
BORREGO SPRINGS 6 $223,750 $106,000 111.08%
CAMPO 8 $120,000 $202,500 -40.74%
CARDIFF BY THE SEA 8 $540,750 $699,000 -22.64%
CARLSBAD 144 $570,000 $669,000 -14.80%
CHULA VISTA 317 $295,000 $350,000 -15.71%
CORONADO 16 $845,500 $1,190,000 -28.95%
DEL MAR 15 $1,100,000 $875,000 25.71%
EL CAJON 126 $253,000 $260,000 -2.69%
ENCINITAS 42 $692,500 $679,500 1.91%
ESCONDIDO 203 $275,000 $300,000 -8.33%
FALLBROOK 54 $370,000 $393,000 -5.85%
IMPERIAL BEACH 18 $237,500 $265,000 -10.38%
JAMUL 5 $650,000 $460,000 41.30%
JULIAN 7 $215,500 $349,000 -38.25%
LA JOLLA 73 $825,000 $825,000 0.00%
LA MESA 62 $313,500 $360,000 -12.92%
LAKESIDE 37 $295,000 $312,500 -5.60%
LEMON GROVE 31 $215,000 $258,500 -16.83%
NATIONAL CITY 37 $180,000 $225,000 -20.00%
OCEANSIDE 227 $310,000 $307,250 0.90%
PAUMA VALLEY 2 $285,000 n/a n/a
PINE VALLEY 3 $314,000 $307,000 2.28%
POWAY 41 $490,000 $505,000 -2.97%
RAMONA 36 $277,500 $286,750 -3.23%
RANCHO SANTA FE 12 $1,824,500 $2,385,000 -23.50%
SAN DIEGO 1,208 $340,000 $360,000 -5.56%
SAN MARCOS 112 $334,000 $350,000 -4.57%
SAN YSIDRO 24 $200,000 $235,000 -14.89%
SANTEE 55 $278,000 $360,000 -22.78%
SOLANA BEACH 17 $780,000 $1,060,000 -26.42%
SPRING VALLEY 74 $219,500 $255,000 -13.92%
VALLEY CENTER 19 $419,000 $370,000 13.24%
VISTA 100 $292,500 $305,500 -4.26%

5 comments:

Jeremy said...

I can tell you for a fact that homes at the lower end of the price spectrum in Riverside (<$200,000) have virtually disappeared. Almost every new listing that pops up on Redfin is a short sale. It is a VERY frustrating time to be buying in Riverside in that price range.

Anwesa said...

This is a great opportunity for cash-rich buyers who are the main beneficiaries of this financial crisis. They can take advantage of the weak dollar value and buy properties in busy cities and centrally located areas.
Read more.
http://www.housingnewslive.com/us-housing-news-articles.php

Sigma said...

On inflation:

"Crucially, China and rising Asia have reached the point where they can no longer keep holding down their currencies to boost exports because this is causing mayhem to their own economies, stoking asset bubbles. Asia's "mercantilist mindset" of recent decades is about to be broken by the spectre of an inflation spiral.

The policy headache was already becoming clear in the final phase of the global credit boom but the financial crisis temporarily masked the effect. The pressures will return with a vengeance as these countries roar back to life, leaving the US and other laggards of the old world far behind.

A monetary policy of near zero rates – further juiced by quantitative easing – is completely incompatible with circumstances in most of Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Divorce is inevitable. The US is expected to hold rates near zero through 2010 to tackle its own crisis. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/6211858/HSBC-bids-farewell-to-dollar-supremacy.html

golfer_X said...

Japan held rate near zero for a decade (longer actually they held it there until 2007) and I'm convinced we are following in their footsteps. I'm also not a believer in decoupling. Currencies can move but a collapse of one in our intertwined world economy will inevitably result in the collapse of many others. The US is still the largest national economy (the EU is larger but that's not a nation). Asia (China)is catching up but it has a ways to go yet. Even if the US falls to 2 or even 3 that is still a huge economy, far too big to risk decoupling the currency.

If the US stops buying Asian and European goods what would happen to those economies? They tank, that's what. Asia isn't going to find another market for all those goods they produce. Just look at how many factories in China have closed in the last year.

Large economies are like the large banks "too big to fail". Man I hate that phrase. We will have to wait and see what happens. But I for one, don't see hyper inflation in our future. I was inclined to think it was possible 2 years ago but now I don't see it. I'm convinced the Fed and government are going for a Japan style solution because it's the only one that lets the banks weather the storm. A quick fix bankrupts all of them.

nathanbishop said...

Increasing price is not good at recession time.
Best Bank Rates